Denkai Recovery Specialist

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PIT BULL COMFORTS SICK DOGS AT THE VET - “Dominic lays with dogs as they come out of surgery, which calms them, making it much easier on the vet techs to handle the dogs as they wake up.”

A Pit Bull named Dominic has earned the title of “Denkai Recovery Specialist” at the Denkai Veterinary Care Clinic in Colorado. Staff members noticed that Dominic would go to dogs who are recovering from surgery and cuddle with them. In addition to dogs, he also comforts cats also. Read more from the greeleytribune.com:

Haswell, though, remained a little skeptical. Dominic was cuddling with the new dog because he was cold, she thought.

She changed her mind later that day, when Dominic lay in the middle of a pile of dogs out of surgery and rested his head on their bodies when they cried.

The dog who cried the most got the most cuddle time from Dominic.

And she remembered the way Dominic rested his head on her neck when she had a headache.

Dominic would even cuddle with cats out of surgery, though they weren’t as receptive as the dogs.

What’s more, it made things easier on them. Dogs coming out of surgery could be wild, even aggressive, and bites were a little too common.

But when Dominic lay with them, they woke up calm, rested and happy.

Dominic now seems to understand his job. When a dog is under, Dominic waits at the foot of the door until clinic workers bring the dog out of surgery and set it on Dominic’s pillow, and he immediately goes over to rest with them.

Dominic cries and paces if another dog is crying in the clinic. He even acts irritated when Haswell rubs a dog’s body in an attempt to wake it up, as if Dominic’s saying, “Hey, I got this.”

“I’ve never, ever seen anything like this,” said Floss Blackburn, who has seen a lot as the founder of Denkai. “He’s got such a sweet heart.”

Dominic is a compassionate dog with an important job. Click here for the full story and here for more about the Denkai Veterinary Clinic. (Photos by Dan England)

Meteorites

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Ever wonder what a meteorite looks like inside? These image were made in cross-polarized light, where a polarizer between the light source and the microscope slide is rotated. The beautiful effect, called birefringence, causes the colors of the crystals in the meteorite’s minerals to change, creating amazing colors, as the polarizer is rotated.

Astronomers and planetary geologists study meteorites in thin section to determine their material makeup. The colors and angles of refraction of the light through the crystals help identify the crystals. Some of the material inside meteorites are quite likely as old as, or older than, the Earth itself.

1, 2) The Allende meteorites (named after a pueblito in Mexico called Allende where they fell in 1969) contain interstellar dust particles which are thought to be the oldest unaltered particles in our Solar System.

3) This meteorite is called NWA 4292 and was found in the Sahara Desert in Africa in 2005.

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Imagine the beautiful minerals floating around out there in space, forged in violent fires across the galaxy, that we’ll never get to see.

Did you know a Nazi expedition found and confiscated a 1,000-year-old Manji-inscribed iron Buddha statue made from a meteorite?

Source: Tumblr

In Orbit

In one of his most ambitious suspended installations to date, artist Tomás Saraceno launches visitors at the K21 Staendehaus museum in Düsseldorf more than 65 feet (20 meters) above the main piazza with a taunt, multi-level web of netting. Titled In Orbit the giant interactive piece is constructed from three separate levels of safety nets accessible from various points in the museum separated by enormous PVC balls measuring almost 30 feet (8.5 meters) in diameter. The resulting aerial landscape is an interesting hybrid between science fiction, spider webs, neural pathways and cloud formations.

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Photo credit: Studio Saraceno & Kunstsammlung NRW

Sparkle Palace Cocktail Table

Want some sparkle in your living room? Here is designer John Foster’s creation.

I want my objects to influence our experience. I embrace chance, and allow the experiential aspect of my work to inform the composition of prints, paintings, sculptures, utilitarian objects, and jewelry,” says John. With this table, John actually turns the sunlight into a part of your interior decor.

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The Dogs of Moscow Subways

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Each morning, like clockwork, they board the subway, off to begin their daily routine amidst the hustle and bustle of the city.

But these aren’t just any daily commuters. These are stray dogs who live in the outskirts of Moscow Russia and commute on the underground trains to and from the city centre in search of food scraps.

Then after a hard day scavenging and begging on the streets, they hop back on the train and return to the suburbs where they spend the night.

Experts studying the dogs, who usually choose the quietest carriages at the front and back of the train, say they even work together to make sure they get off at the right stop – after learning to judge the length of time they need to spend on the train.

Scientists believe this phenomenon began after the Soviet Union collapsed in the 1990s, and Russia’s new capitalists moved industrial complexes from the city centre to the suburbs.

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Dr Andrei Poiarkov, of the Moscow Ecology and Evolution Institute, said: “These complexes were used by homeless dogs as shelters, so the dogs had to move together with their houses. Because the best scavenging for food is in the city centre, the dogs had to learn how to travel on the subway – to get to the centre in the morning, then back home in the evening, just like people.”

Dr Poiarkov told how the dogs like to play during their daily commute. He said: “They jump on the train seconds before the doors shut, risking their tails getting jammed. They do it for fun. And sometimes they fall asleep and get off at the wrong stop.”

The dogs have also amazingly learned to use traffic lights to cross the road safely, said Dr Poiarkov. And they use cunning tactics to obtain tasty morsels of shawarma, a kebab-like snack popular in Moscow.

With children the dogs “play cute” by putting their heads on youngsters’ knees and staring pleadingly into their eyes to win sympathy – and scraps.

Dr Poiarkov added: “Dogs are surprisingly good psychologists.”